Miscellany – Sept. 1, 2020

Geneva Gano’s book The Little Art Colony and US Modernism will be published by Edinburgh University Press this month.

Aimee Roundtree is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Generation AI Project, which is helping to create industry guidelines, competitions, and standards for how artificial intelligence is tested and deployed in products for children.

Katie Kapurch interviewed Blues Hall of Fame inductee, Bettye LaVette, about her new album Blackbirds for an article published on CultureSonar: https://www.culturesonar.com/arising-to-this-moment-bettye-lavettes-blackbirds/

The full interview will appear in Dr. Kapurch’s forthcoming NEH-supported book, Blackbird Singing: Black America Remixes the Beatles (Penn State University Press).

MFA student Chisom Ogoke is the recipient of the Graduate Endowed Fellowship in Liberal Arts. The scholarship is awarded to full-time College of Liberal Arts graduate students with demonstrated academic ability, community service or engagement, and character.

MFA student Sarah Huerta’s chapbook of poems “The Things We Bring with Us: Travel Poems” will be published with Headmistress Press in 2021. It was a finalist for their Charlotte Mew Chapbook Contest.

Susan Morrison was interviewed by American Public Media for The Water Main’s podcast called “In Deep.” Her episode about excrement in the Middle Ages and the Great Stink of the Victorian Period, “Dirty Water,” can be heard here:  https://www.indeep.org/episode/2020/08/05/dirty-water

An excerpt from Steph Grossman’s novel-in-progress was shortlisted for The Masters Review’s 2020 Flash Fiction Contest. Her entry is one of fifteen pieces from which judge Sherrie Flick will choose the three contest finalists. https://mastersreview.com/2020-flash-fiction-contest-shortlist/

Miscellany – July 15, 2020

James Bryant Reeves’ Godless Fictions in the Eighteenth Century: A Literary History of Atheismwas published on July 9, 2020 by Cambridge University Press. The book focuses on depictions of atheists and atheism throughout the Enlightenment era, arguing that imaginative, literary reactions against atheism helped sustain various forms of religious belief throughout the period. His recent article “Antislavery Literature and the Decline of Hell” was published in Eighteenth-Century Studies.

MATC graduate Michael Trice’s co-edited book Platforms, Protests, and the Challenge of Networked Democracy was published on July 8, 2020 by Palgrave MacMillan. Michael is a lecturer at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Writing, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication Program.

An interview by Jon Marc Smith and Smith Henderson about their upcoming novel, Make Them Cry,was published in CrimeReads. See full interview: https://crimereads.com/what-does-it-take-for-two-people-to-actually-write-a-novel-together/

Susan Morrison’s article “Marie de France’s Saint Patrick’s Purgatory as Dynamic Diptych” was published in Le Cygne: Journal of the International Marie de France Society. Her essay “The Body: Unstable, Gendered, Theorized” appears in A Cultural History of Comedy in the Middle Ages, edited by Martha Bayless.

Recent B.A. in English graduate Cole Plunkett was awarded a scholarship to attend the MFA in Creative Writing Program at The New School in New York City.

MFA poetry student James Trask’s poem “Springtime and Single Again” was awarded Second Honorable Mention for the 15th Mudfish Poetry Prize. This year’s contest was judged by Erica Jong. This poem and three other poems by James (“Things That Can Kill You,” “The Stories,” and “A Smear of Red”) were selected for publication in the forthcoming issue of Mudfish. “A Smear of Red” previously won both 2nd prize in this year’s San Antonio Writer’s Guild Annual Writing Contest and 2nd prize for this year’s Austin Poetry Society Award. James was also a finalist for last year’s 14th Mudfish Poetry Prize.

Dr. Luan Brunson Haynes, professor (1967-2008) and Chair of the Department of English (1972-83), has published Ktimene, an historical novel set in ancient Greece. Those who know Luan know of her deep love for Greece the place, its history, and its literature. Her novel presents the epic of Odysseus through the eyes and experiences of a woman, Ktimene. As per the official description: “The narrative of Odysseus and his adventures—the Odyssey—has been a staple of ancient storytelling for millennia, but now the account of his sailing the Mediterranean has a new version: a woman has sneaked on board, in disguise. Not just any woman, but his own sister. Based on research in Greece and other locations, Luan Brunson Haynes has given us more than a glimpse of the primitive world. She has written a lively and entertaining tale of the fearless and beautiful Ktimene and her family. Come along on her far-flung journeys as this Grecian princess learns from her various roles—wife, mother, trader, hostage, heiress, protector, storyteller, ruler—and watches her children grow up to travel the known world and beyond. Through the twists and turns of fate, Ktimene is indeed the founder of civilizations.” Contact Teya Rosenberg (tr11@txstate.edu) for more information.

Please submit all announcements to the English Department’s Miscellany Submission Form found here: https://www.english.txstate.edu/news/Miscellany-Submission.html

Miscellany – July 3, 2020

Cyrus Cassells’ poem, “Like Christ Overturning the Moneylenders’ Tables,” in praise of journalists, appeared recently in On The Seawall: http://www.ronslate.com/like-christ-overturning-the-moneylenders-tables/. Cyrus was also awarded the Civitella Ranieri Writing Fellowship, which consists of a residency at the Civitella Ranieri Center in Italy during the 2021, 2022, or 2023 season. Cyrus was awarded this residency through a highly competitive jury process that resulted in the selection of just 30 candidates from a pool of over 165. The Fellowship will provide Cyrus with six weeks to concentrate on his work in the company of other Fellows from around the world, and includes round-trip transportation to the Center’s 15th-century castle in Umbria, Italy, as well as a private space for living and working.

Rob Tally’s article “Spatial Literary Studies” appears in Literary Geographies: https://nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.literarygeographies.net%2Findex.php%2FLitGeogs%2Farticle%2Fview%2F215&data=02%7C01%7Csw13%40txstate.edu%7Cf58f93bca4654225ad1608d81142f62d%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C637278326575416307&sdata=bEdLizqIi%2F3OmRWe8dqeQwP4KwPTwikN3IsoYj8w1Qc%3D&reserved=0. His essay “Sea Narratives as Nautical Charts: On the Literary Cartography of Oceanic Spaces” appears in the Chinese journal Foreign Literature Studies; it is an extended version of the keynote speech he gave at Ningbo University last November.

Anthony Bradley’s essay “My Mother’s Guide to Video” appears in Gayly Dreadful: https://www.gaylydreadful.com/blog/pride-2020-my-mothers-guide-to-to-video.

An essay by Miriam Williams and Natasha Jones (Michigan State University), “The Just Use of Imagination: A Call to Action,” which is a response to recent events, was published by both the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing https://attw.org/publications/the-just-use-of-imagination-a-call-to-action/  and the Spark: 4C4Equality Journal(https://teacher-scholar-activist.org/) in June.

Two essays by MFA fiction student Nkiacha Atemnkeng have been accepted for publication by the South African literary magazine, The Johannesburg Review of Books.

Chase Vanderslice, an MA Literature student starting Fall 2020, has received a Texas State Graduate Merit Fellowship, a fellowship for incoming students of the highest caliber. Chase graduated from the University of Alabama with a BA in English in December 2019 and is interested in pursuing studies in Medieval literature.

Two poems by Steve Wilson, “What Isn’t There” and “Violently sundered,” will appear in Never Forgotten: 100 Poets Remember 9/11, coming out this fall.

Make Them Cry, the upcoming novel by Jon Marc Smith and his co-writer Smith Henderson, received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews: https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/smith-henderson/make-them-cry/

Rebecca Bell-Metereau and Steve Wilson have been elected to six-year terms as two of only four At-Large Members of the Board of Directors for the Texas Faculty Association.

MFA poetry graduate A.R. Rogers’ poem “Interior Decorating” was short-listed for the River Heron ReviewPoetry Prize.

 

Miscellany – Jun 8, 2020

Aimee Roundtree’s article, “Student Recruitment in Technical and Professional Communication Programs,” written with Felicia Chong, was published on May 26 by Technical Communication Quarterly: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10572252.2020.1774660

Graduate Studies Director Teya Rosenberg sent congratulations to the twelve MA Literature students who graduated this spring and to the respective directors of their Area Exam or Thesis committees: Amber Avila (Banerjee), Anne Barker (Rosenberg), Justin Gorney (Wend-Walker), Nathan Hagman (Reeves), Lindsey Jones (Schwebel), Victoria Kuykendall (Schwebel), Logan McKinney (Smith), Kelly Porter (Smith), John Saldana (Gano), Katherine Stephens (McClancy), Abigail Taylor (Tally), and Devyn Vest (McClancy).

MFA fiction student Chisom Ogoke was selected as an Alternate candidate for the English Teaching Program coordinated by the Fulbright U.S. Student Program.

Cecily Parks’ poem “December” was featured on “The Slowdown” podcast: https://www.slowdownshow.org/episode/2020/06/01/396-december?fbclid=IwAR1jLP7y-qLwV-VFGIWY4ACxPI9X_O6lyAheyXkMoOXnCFN3fz1xDYs4DqQ

“Science and the Humanities in the Time of Pandemic: Better Together,” Coauthored by Jule McCormick Weng, Kathryn Conrad and Cóilín Parsons, appeared in the June 1 The Irish Times: https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/science-and-the-humanities-in-the-time-of-pandemic-better-together-1.4261769

Several poems by MFA poetry student Anthony Bradley appeared in a recent issue of Bloop: https://www.grindrbloop.com/zine/2020/poetry-spotlight-anthony-isaac-bradley

An online magazine called The Nervous Breakdown is doing a special focus on Black poets this month and is featuring three of Cyrus Cassells’ poems — “Sin Eater, Beware,” “My Black Friend,” and “Sestina for Booker T. Washington” — from his forthcoming book, The World That The Shooter Left Us (Four Way Books: March 2022) on June 4, 6, and 8. Here is “Sin Eater, Beware”: http://thenervousbreakdown.com/ccassells/2020/06/sin-eater-beware/

On June 5, Steve Wilson’s “Restrictions” was the poem of the day at New Rivers Press: https://www.facebook.com/NewRiversPress/photos/a.135591973650/10157608236963651/?type=3&theater

MA Literature graduate and Lecturer Whitney May’s article, “The Lioness and the Protector: The (Post)Feminist Dialogic of Tamora Pierce’s Lady Knights,” has been published in this year’s volume of Children’s Literature: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/756798

Miscellany – May 23, 2020

The following faculty were recognized this May for major achievements during the 2019-20 academic year:

Rebecca Bell-Metereau. Transgender Cinema. Rutgers University Press, 2019.

Recipient of Choice magazine’s Outstanding Academic Title award.

Cyrus Cassells. Still Life with Children: Selected Poems of Francesc Parcerisas.

Stephen F. Austin State University Press, 2019.

Cyrus Cassells. Recipient of Guggenheim Fellowship, awarded April 2019.

Jennifer DuBois. The Spectators. Penguin Random House, 2019.

Logan Fry. Harpo Before the Opus. Omnidawn, 2019. Recipient of Omnidawn’s 1st/2nd Book Prize.

Eric Leake. Recipient of Senior Fulbright Fellowship from the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program. 2019.

Susan Signe Morrison. Recipient of two awards from Literary Classics, the Gold Medal in Historical Young Adult and Words on Wings Book Award, in 2019 for

Home Front Girl: A Diary of Love, Literature, and Growing Up in Wartime America. Chicago Review Press, 2018.

Cecily Parks. Recipient of Poetry Society of America Lucille Medwick Memorial Award, 2019, for the poem, “The Rio Grande.”

Robert T. Tally, Jr. Topophrenia: Place, Narrative, and the Spatial Imagination. Indiana University Press (“Spatial Humanities”) series, 2019.

Julie McCormick Weng. Co-edited with Kathryn Conrad and Cóilín Parsons, Science, Technology, and Irish Modernism, Syracuse University Press, 2019.

Steve Wilson. The Reaches. Finishing Line Press, 2019.

Katie Kapurch’s “‘Photograph’- We Are All Ringo Now” (https://www.culturesonar.com/photograph-we-are-all-ringo-now/), “Astrid Kirchherr: What She Taught the Beatles” (https://www.culturesonar.com/astrid-kirchherr-what-she-taught-the-beatles/) and “Martha Wash’s “Love and Conflict” – The Album for 2020” (https://www.culturesonar.com/martha-washs-love-and-conflict-the-album-for-2020/)were published on CultureSonarrecently. Katie also has a chapter, “A Girls’ Studies Approach to YA Literature,” in Teaching Young Adult Literature, an edited collection published by MLA (2020).

MFA poetry student James Trask finished 1st and received cash prizes in two contests that are part of a series of annual contests administered by the Austin Poetry Society, each with different requirements for poetic form and/or theme.  Both poems will be published in the forthcoming edition (2019-2020) of Best Austin Poetry.  James also placed 2nd in five other contests, winning additional cash prizes.  In an eighth contest, his poem was distinguished with an Honorable Mention.

English Major Courtney Ludwick’s article, “A Dishonest Wardrobe: Fashion and Costume in Geoffrey Chaucer’s ‘General Prologue,’” was published in Texas State Undergraduate Researchthis Spring. She was mentored by Susan Morrison.

“Rereading Stephen King on the Eve of My MFA,” an essay by MFA fiction student Steph Grossman, appeared in The Masters Reviewhttps://mastersreview.com/new-voices-rereading-stephen-king-on-the-eve-of-my-mfa-by-steph-grossman/

MA Literature student Luise Noé (Germany) was awarded a P.E.O. International Peace Prize Scholarship. She is one of 15 students on campus, one of 2 from the College of Liberal Arts. The scholarship, established in 1949, provides up to $12,500 of support for women from countries other than the United States and Canada who are pursuing graduate studies in one of those two countries. Luise worked on her application with the External Funding Specialists in the Graduate College.

Cyrus Cassells was interviewed by the Lambda Literary Reviewin support of the April publication of his new chapbook at Nine Mile Press, More Than Watchmen at Daybreak:https://www.lambdaliterary.org/2020/04/cyrus-cassells/. He was also interviewed as feature poet in the latest issue of Borderlands: The Texas Review: https://www.borderlands.org/featuredpoet?fbclid=IwAR09ZxhRb6KCfC26z5F3avVxsgOwGLLN7zi1cn1_-aQDBjN4jFJgSGj3gJw.

Jon Marc Smith was interviewed by Publishers Weeklyas part of a feature on new thrillers coming out in 2020: https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/new-titles/adult-announcements/article/82768-border-disorder-mysteries-thrillers-2020.html.

Amanda Scott’s essay, “A Body in Crisis, A Magnificent Rapture,” will appear in Entropy.

Miscellany – April 23, 2020

MATC graduate Meghalee Das was awarded the Outstanding Instructor Award in First-Year Composition in the category of 1st Year Ph.D. Instructor by Texas Tech University’s Department of English. Meghalee is enrolled in the PhD in Technical Communication and Rhetoric Program at Texas Tech.

Rob Tally’s article “The Aesthetics of Distance: Space, Ideology, and Critique in the Study of World Literature” appears in the Journal of English Language and Literature.

Susan Morrison’s short story “FaceTimes” was published in Tejascovido:https://www.tejascovido.com/blog/facetimes. Susan was interviewed about the history of toilet paper for History.com: https://www.history.com/news/toilet-paper-hygiene-ancient-rome-china

On April 6, Nine Mile Books published Cyrus Cassells’ chapbook, More Than Watchmen at Daybreak. It’s available from Nine Mile Books (http://www.ninemile.org/) and Small Press Distribution (https://www.spdbooks.org/…/more-than-watchmen-at-daybreak.a…). Cyrus also recently published two new politically-inspired: “Quid Pro Quo (Two Baritones on a Phone)”

in The Southampton Review(on pp. 134-135) available to download for free:

https://www.thesouthamptonreview.com/subscribe/sf2020-digital-download; and “The Only Way To Fight The Plague Is Decency” in this On The Seawall: A Community Gathering of Writing and Commentary: www.ronslate.com

Passages Northjust published MFA fiction student Ben McCormick’s  “The Storms I’ve Been Before a Hurricane.”

Lagos Reviewpublished first-year fiction student Nkiacha Atemnkeng’s obituary essay, https://thelagosreview.ng/obituary-adieu-manu-dibango-nkiacha-atemnkeng/ about the death of Africa’s greatest saxophonist, Manu Dibango, the first high-profile musician to die of Covid-19.

Katie Kapurch’s “The Paul McCartney Song We Need Right Now,” which addresses this coronavirus moment, has become “the most popular post ever published” on CultureSonar, according to their statistics. You can read it here: https://www.culturesonar.com/the-paul-mccartney-song-we-need-right-now/?fbclid=IwAR2tMHbKBeyNmfQjEzjWUvm4Gp8PWZSx9UmtaU3ApGqr7WAxonCKtx1QaFY

Caleb Ajinomoh’s story “Rites Evasion Maneuvers” has been shortlisted for the 2020 Commonwealth Short Story Prize. The story was selected out of 5107 entries from five continents. Caleb is a first year MFA fiction candidate.

TA and third-year MFA fiction student Ryan Lopez has recently had two stories accepted for publication. “Return Flight” will be published in Lunate on May 25 and “The Solving of Climate Change” will be published sometime this fall in Abstract Magazine.

Lecturer Vanessa Couto Johnson has a poem–“mote”–in Across the Social Distances, an online journal for poems addressing the current crisis: https://acrossthesocialdistances.tumblr.com/post/615384149719678976/mote-by-vanessa-couto-johnson She also has another poem, “Self-Portrait of an INTJ reunited with inner-resilient-child in late March 2020,” in TEJASCOVIDOhttps://www.tejascovido.com/blog/self-portrait-of-an-intj-reunited-with-inner-resilient-child-in-late-march-2020?fbclid=IwAR3HbsAZFNibrKJ7qSub5XkyVn3xTS0ANyQIxEHRZRoBG6X40syD8FwM46M

Allison Grace Myers’ essay “These Thin Green Hints,” about waiting to adopt, has been published by Gulf Coast Journal:

https://gulfcoastmag.org/online/winter/spring-2020/these-thin-green-hints-20/

Dodgeball Days,” a poem by MFA poetry student Asa Johnson, appears in the Winter/Spring 2020 issue of Light.

Jo McIntosh, who earned her MA Literature degree at Texas State and now teaches at Concordia University (Austin), has been accepted and now funded for five years while she pursues her PhD in English at the University of Houston. To support her studies, Concordia is developinga package to put her on advancement in rank and give her a raise for a second car, gas, and books.

Miscellany – April 2, 2020

Chris Margrave’s short film, The Lesser Known Rules of Werewolves, which he co-wrote and acted in, was selected for screening at the South by Southwest Film Festival on March 14th.

Kathleen Peirce’s manuscript, Lion’s Paw, was a finalist for this year’s Dorset Prize with Tupelo Press.

Kitty Ledbetter’s article, “The Women’s Press,” has just been published in Volume 2 of the Edinburgh History of the British and Irish Press, a three-volume history that offers a definitive account of newspaper and periodical press activity across Britain and Ireland from 1650 to the present day.

Longleaf Review published MFA fiction student Taylor Kirby’s essay, “Relics, Registries, and Other Bastard Things,” in their latest issue.

Make Them Cry, a novel by Jon Marc Smith and his co-author Smith Henderson, will come out this fall from Ecco: https://crimereads.com/excerpt-make-them-cry/

Caleb Ajinomoh’s short story, “Taking Mr. Itopa,” will be published in the New Voices section of The Masters Review. Caleb is a first-year MFA fiction student.

MFA poetry student James Trask placed 2nd and received a cash prize in the Poetry category of the San Antonio Writers’ Guild 28th Annual Writing Contest, an open competition with nationwide entries. This year’s contest was judged by Caitlyn Doyle.  James’ poem, “A Smear of Red” was written for Steve Wilson’s graduate Poetry Workshop last fall.

Susan Morrison recently was interviewed by The New Yorker’s Talk of the Town about toilet paper hoarding: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/03/30/what-would-freud-make-of-the-toilet-paper-panic?fbclid=IwAR1615G5QI4DDonXeAcy2GljwI0eFNz67Sm-Ix7z9SbTOGm-DeZLVJsKHtM

On March 18, PoemoftheWeek.com celebrated Cyrus Cassells’ The Gospel According to Wild Indigo, published in 2018 by Southern Illinois University Press.

MFA fiction student Clayton Bradshaw has accepted an offer of admission to the PhD in English program (Creative Writing) in the Center for Writers at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Miscellany – March 4, 2020

Whitney May’s essay, “The Technology of Anguish: (Re)Imagining Post-9/11 Trauma in the Fantasy Universes of Tamora Pierce,” has been published in the edited collection Displaced: Literature of Indigeneity, Migration, and Trauma, from Routledge. The collection is part of their “Studies in Contemporary Literature” series. Whitney recently participated as a panelist at the Common Experience event “The Truth About Urban Myths and Legends,” a roundtable discussion between Texas State students and scholars of folklore at the university.

Vanessa Couto Johnson will be a reader at the AWP 2020 Offsite joint event of Forklift, Ohio; Rinky Dink Press; and Slope Editions, held at Bar 1919 on Thursday, March 5 from 9-11 p.m. She is also scheduled for author signings at the AWP Bookfair at Slope Editions’ table (T2036) on Saturday, March 7 from 12:30-2:00 p.m.

MFA fiction student Brady Brickner-Wood published a review of Emily Nemens’ debut novel, The Cactus League, in Harvard Review. Her short story, “Shrine Room,” will appear in Bellevue Literary Review‘s spring issue.

 Katie Kapurch published “The Beatles, Fashion, and Cultural Iconography,” a chapter in Kenneth Womack’s new collection, The Beatles in Context. The book is part of Cambridge University Press’s “Composers in Context” series and explores wide-ranging aspects of the Beatles’ artistry.

Kathleen Peirce’s new poetry manuscript, Lion’s Paw, will be published by Miami University Press.

Cyrus Cassells and Naomi Shihab Nye will receive awards at this year’s meeting of the Texas Institute of Letters: Cyrus’ Still Life with Children: Selected Poems of Francesc Parcerisas will receive The Souerette Diehl Fraser Award for Best Translation of a Book, and Naomi’s The Tiny Journalist will receive The Helen C. Smith Memorial Award for Best Book of Poetry.

Assistant Professor Cecily Parks has been named Sigma Tau Delta Professor of the Year. Her poem “Nasturtiums” appears in the latest issue of wildness at https://readwildness.com/21/.

Ross Feeler’s short story “Parisian Honeymoon,” was published in Electric Literature‘s Recommended Reading, with an introduction by Brandon Taylor: <https://electricliterature.com/parisian-honeymoon-ross-feeler/>

MARC student Lea Colchado’s poems “Ausencia” and “Sundays” have been accepted for publication in Boundless: The Anthology of the Rio Grande Valley International Poetry Festival.

Dean of the Graduate College Dr. Andrea Golato reports that Dr. Debra Monroe, faculty member in the Department of English, is the recipient of the 2019–2020 Conference of Southern Graduate Schools Outstanding Mentor Award. Since more than 200 graduate colleges belong to CSGS, the competition for this award is quite fierce and being selected is a very special honor. The Graduate College nominated Dr. Monroe, who was also the recipient of the 2019-2020 Graduate College Outstanding Mentor Award, for her outstanding work with countless Master’s students in the Creative Writing MFA program. In particular, the committee recognized her tireless efforts to work closely with both students and alumni and help them publish their creative works as award-winning books and stories in high-profile venues. Through her efforts, she has greatly enhanced the academic and professional pursuits of her students while also attracting top-quality applicants to the Creative Writing Program at Texas State. The Conference of Southern Graduate Schools Outstanding Mentor Award will be bestowed upon Dr. Monroe next Weekend at the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools Annual Meeting. She will receive a monetary award and a very nice plaque.

Kitty Ledbetter’s article, “The Women’s Press,” has just been published in Volume 2 of the Edinburgh History of the British and Irish Press, a three-volume history that offers a definitive account of newspaper and periodical press activity across Britain and Ireland from 1650 to the present day.

Miscellany – February 17, 2020

MFA poetry student James Trask has six poems in the latest issue of Mudfish Magazine.  James was a finalist in their contest and read at their launch party in NYC on January 16.

Susan Morrison was an Invited Scholar and core participant in the multidisciplinary seminar on “Waste: Histories and Futures” at Rice University in mid-January. An interview with Susan on the joys of wandering the Texas State campus, conducted by Emily Cordo (MFA poetry student), appeared in TXST Connections: https://stories.txstate.edu/uniquely-texas-state/2019/a-wanderers-guide-to-txst.html.

“Spectrality and Spectatorship: Heterotopic Doubling in Cinematic Circuses,” by MA Literature graduate and Lecturer Whitney May, appears in The Big Top on the Big Screen: Explorations of the Circus on Film, from McFarland & Company.

MFA fiction student Clayton Bradshaw’s review of Cyrus Cassell’s The World that The Shooter Left Us appears in the latest issue of Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review.

Assistant Professor Cecily Parks’ poem “The Seeds” will appear in The Best American Poetry 2020; the anthology will be published by Scribner this fall. Cecily’s poem “December” appears in the February 14 issue of The New Yorker.

Miriam Williams and her co-author Natasha Jones won the 2020 CCCC Technical and Scientific Communication Award in the category of Best Article Reporting Historical Research or Textual Studies in Technical and Scientific Communication for their article, “Technologies of Disenfranchisement: Literacy Tests and Black Voters in the US from 1890 to 1965,” which appeared in Technical Communication. They will be presented with the award at the Awards Session of the 2020 CCCC Convention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

MFA fiction graduate and Lecturer Jay Cruz will present “Connected Hypermasculinity in Nineties Films and Today: Fight Club, The Truman Show, and Office Space” at the Far West Popular Culture Conference, taking place in Las Vegas from Feb. 21-23.

Steve Wilson’s poem “Seasonals” appeared in the 2019 issue of The Concord Saunterer: A Journal of Thoreau Studies, produced by the Thoreau Society. On Feb. 12, Steve read from his new book, The Reaches, at an event sponsored by the San Marcos Public Library to mark the collection’s publication.

MARC student Lea Colchado will present “Chola y Sola: A Chicana’s Fight To Find Her Voz En Academia (An Autohistoria)” at the La Chola Conference 2020, taking place at Mira Costa College in Oceanside California from April 23rd-24th.

Poetry International Online has just published a special feature of Cyrus Cassells’ border crisis poems: https://poetryinternationalonline.com/cyrus-cassells-a-chapbook-of-border-crisis-poems/. Cyrus also has an interview and two more border crisis poems in the new edition of Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review. His first-ever chapbook, More Than Watchmen At Daybreak, is due out from Nine Mile Books on April 6. I will be reading from it on March 30 at 5:30PM at Texas State. Cyrus Cassells also has been elected to the Texas Institute of Letters.

Miscellany – January 22, 2020

The National Book Critics Circle Award announced a special lifetime achievement award to recognize Naomi Shihab Nye, The Ivan Sandrof Award for Lifetime Achievement, which is given to a person or institution — a writer, publisher, critic, or editor, among others — who has, over time, made significant contributions to book culture. The awards ceremony in New York is March 12.

MA Literature graduate and Lecturer Whitney Shylee May presented two papers at the recent meeting of the Modern Language Association, held in Seattle: “‘It Was Only Because I Was Radically Both’: Fin De Siècle Doppelgängers and the New British Cosmopolitanism”; and “‘Many Books, Many Poes’: Pop-Culture Authorship and the Cult of Edgar Allan Poe.”

Lecturer and MFA poetry graduate Vanessa Couto Johnson has a poem in the Dialogist, accompanied by a recording of her reading the poem: https://dialogist.org/poetry/2019-week-50-vanessa-couto-johnson She also has a poem in Everything in Aspic‘s debut issue, which can be read here: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5d5883acff86bf0001f42ae9/t/5df6f6dd460f77349dcd341d/1576466151495/Everything+in+Aspic+%231.pdf

MFA poetry student Anthony Bradley’s essay, “My Accent Makes Me Beautiful,” appears in the latest issue of Coachella Review: http://thecoachellareview.com/wordpress/archives-2/nonfiction/my-accent-makes-me-beautiful/

“associative thinking,” by MFA poetry graduate and Lecturer Melanie Robinson, was published online by The Boiler Journalhttps://theboilerjournal.com/2020/01/07/melanie-kristeen/

Rob Tally’s article “Said, Marxism, and Spatiality: Wars of Position in Oppositional Criticism” appears in ariel: A Review of International English Literature, in a special issue (belatedly) commemorating the 40th anniversary of Edward Said’s Orientalism. Rob’s interview with Professors Liyuan Zhu and Yang Lu of Fudan University in Shanghai has just been published in the Chinese journal Academic Research. His English responses were translated into Chinese by Dr. Fang Ying, who was a visiting scholar in the English Department here last year. The title, in English, is “Spatial Theory and Geographical Criticism: A Dialogue between Zhu Luyuan, Lu Yang, and Robert Tally.”

The D.H. Lawrence Society of North America awarded MFA fiction student Mary-Pat Hayton a partial Fellowship to attend the 15th D.H. Lawrence International Conference in Taos, New Mexico, July 12 -17, where she will present.

MFA poetry graduate Danielle Zaccagnino’s book of hybrid essays and experimental poems Suppose Muscle, Suppose Night, Suppose This is forthcoming from Mason Jar Press in August 2020.

Steve Wilson took part in a poetry reading at Blue Willow Bookshop in Houston on January 18, in support of the anthology Enchantment of the Ordinary, which includes Steve’s work.

Debra Monroe was interviewed about creating her teaching anthology—and about the genre itself and about pedagogical aims—in Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies. https://www.assayjournal.com/debra-monroe.html?fbclid=IwAR1N9OKDUhWMhxsYQQOGmEHgacRHWZy96AiAfqA0UWQs0W_12SfJxvu4F-s